The Saint John’s Bible

The Saint John’s Bible is the first completely handwritten and illuminated Bible commissioned by a Benedictine Abbey since the invention of the printing press more than five hundred years ago.

 
 
 Photo courtesy of Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. 2014

Photo courtesy of Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. 2014

The Heritage Edition

The Saint John’s Bible is a singular achievement: the complete text of the Bible, written on calfskin vellum using traditional tools and inks. As a work of sacred art, it ignites the spiritual imagination of all those who view its pages. However, the beauty, richness, and inspiration of The Saint John’s Bible are not limited to those able to see the original pages in a museum setting. Limited to 299 sets, the seven volumes of the Heritage Edition of The Saint John’s Bible are true to the scale, beauty, and artistic intent of the original manuscript. Saint Philip’s is proud to house the Gospel and Acts volume, and to use it for the proclamation of the Gospel in all our Sunday morning services this year.


Visio Divina

At 6:30pm each Wednesday evening throughout the fall, as part of our regular Mosaic Dinner programming, we are thrilled to offer the experience of Visio Divina: seeing the Word. Seeing the Word is a program of guided reflection that makes it possible to pray with images from The Saint John's Bible. Participants listen and meditate on scripture, see with eyes of faith as they gaze on illuminations, pray to God, contemplate the Spirit's movements, and reflect how they might become more Christ-like. All are welcome!

 Photo courtesy of Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. 2014

Photo courtesy of Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. 2014


 Photo courtesy of Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. 2014

Photo courtesy of Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. 2014

The Beauty of Holiness

The Saint John’s Bible reflects Benedictine values, particularly highlighting three themes: hospitality; conversion of life; and justice for God’s people. Additionally, gold leaf was used liberally to represent the divine, silver/platinum to reflect the principle of wisdom, and rainbows to show God’s promise in the vivid illuminations in the volumes Prophets and Revelation. Inked stamps, textile patterns and other motifs carry themes across volumes. A wide range of artistic styles, including iconography, abstraction, chrysography and illustration, work together to expand our visual vocabulary for the sacred.

Banner image: Creation, Covenant, Shekinah, Kingdom, Donald Jackson, Copyright 2006, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota USA. Used by permission. All rights reserved.